Bringing Your Vision-Based Disability Claim Into Focus

Vision is a sense that many people take for granted. Although many individuals wear glasses and contacts to correct their vision or may even get LASIK, not may people consider the consequences of having a chronic disease that limits your ability to see clearly even with corrective measures. There are three specific conditions that our firm sees on a recurring basis involving vision losses: glaucoma, macular degeneration, and retinitis pigmentosa. A disability claim based upon loss of vision can be surprisingly difficult, as many insurance companies demand a high level of vision loss before being considered to be eligible for benefits. This, however, does not mean that such people are still able to perform their job. If there is strong medical evidence to back up your claims and an accurate and complete job description to show how you are no longer able to the material and substantial duties of your occupation due to these limitations,  insurance companies will have little choice but to approve you for the disability benefits you deserve. Each of these conditions has different tests and treatments that will be necessary to identify and treat the disease.

Glaucoma

GlaucomaGlaucoma is not a specific disease itself but is the name for a group of diseases that affect the optic nerves and can cause blindness. In fact, glaucoma is the second-leading cause of blindness worldwide. It affects 1 out of every 200 people under the age of 50 and rarely exhibits any symptoms. The two main types of glaucoma are “open-angle” and “closed-angle,” referring to the area between the iris and cornea. Closed-angle glaucoma often has a sudden, painful onset and can cause a sudden loss of vision. However, the amount of discomfort involved usually leads sufferers to pursue treatment before damage becomes permanent. Open-angle, chronic glaucoma on the other hand progresses at a slower rate and doesn’t cause the same level of discomfort. Because of this, many sufferers don’t realize they have lost vision until the disease has progressed significantly. This is the type of glaucoma that causes the most disability issues. Because of the lack of clear symptoms, many sufferers don’t realize their deteriorating condition until it’s too late to restore their eyesight, leading to permanent losses of ability.

Qualifying for short term disability benefits based upon a diagnosis of glaucoma is much more common than qualifying for long term disability. There are a number of effective treatments for the condition, and insurance companies often assume (and/or insist) that anyone who suffers from this condition will soon return to their former health – even though some cases of glaucoma are permanently impairing. This is why it’s so important to follow the proper medical protocols for testing and for treatment during the course of the condition. Testing for glaucoma is a part of most standard eye examinations and include measurements of the pressure in the eye, changes in the size of the eye, and examination of the optical nerve for visible damage. If glaucoma is detected early enough, it can be treated a number of different ways. There are surgical remedies, medications, medicinal eye drops, and even medical marijuana (depending on where you live) that have been proven effective in controlling and even reversing the symptoms of glaucoma.  The best outcome is to successfully treat the glaucoma and recover your eyesight.  But if someone suffers from glaucoma that has permanently damaged their eyesight, then it’s critical to have substantial testing and medical proof for the medical condition, its symptoms, as well as documentation tying the occupational duties to the person’s eyesight. If you’ve been accurately diagnosed with the condition, continue with proper care and treatment, and prove that you can’t perform the occupational duties, you should be able to maintain the disability benefits you deserve.

We’ll go into the other vision conditions that often result in disability claims in our next posting.

Losing your vision can be a terrifying event, and many people expect that their disability insurance company will not question their claim.  But not only are many of these claims questioned – they’re denied using a variety of policy defenses. If you’re considering filing a disability claim due to your loss of vision or feel like you’re being unfairly hassled by the claims process, please visit our website to sign up for a free consultation or call our offices toll-free at (855) 828-4100.

4 Types of Disability Claims Caused By Car Accidents

While a car accident itself may not be a reason to file a disability claim, many disability claims result from injuries sustained in a crash or other type of accident. While you may not qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance if the injuries don’t totally incapacitate you for more than 12 months, many individual and group long term disability policies cover the inability to work due to these incidents as well as almost all short term disability policies. From back problems to broken bones to “whiplash,” there are many different types of injuries that can result from even seemingly minor vehicle accidents, including some that may not become apparent for an extended period of time. Today’s blog post is going to review some of the different types of injuries that may result from these accidents and how to obtain the disability benefits you deserve while recovering from these injuries. Continue reading

10 Reasons People Neglect Filing Their Disability Claim

At our firm, we have many clients who contact us quite a while after they’ve become disabled and stopped working. These clients are desperate for income to support their family and need their disability benefits approved immediately, which is challenging at best when dealing with an insurance company. In order to avoid such desperate situations, it’s important to begin the process of preparing and filing your disability claim as soon as the doctor diagnoses you and tells you to stop working. This list provides 10 reasons that people delay filing their disability claims and how to prevent these problems from happening to you.   Continue reading

Insurance Investigators: An Inside Look At Their Techniques

We’ve often mentioned insurance company investigators and their tactics as extremely adept at developing reasons to deny legitimate disability claims. Insurance companies like to hire former FBI agents and police detectives who have been specifically taught to treat their targets as adversaries and be cynical of any answers – which they innocently refer to as being professional. These investigators have undergone specialized training on how to dig up information and how to conduct interviews that can be twisted against claimants and used by claims examiners to deny disability claims. Due to our connections, our firm has seen some of the confidential training materials used by disability claims operations that help provide insight into the investigative techniques and methods used to interview claimants. This information can be invaluable to claimants, allowing them to more properly prepare for the interview, whether it’s a scheduled appointment or an unannounced visit. Today’s blog is going to breakdown and summarize some of the key points to help you handle an interview and understand the underlying purposes for the questions.   Continue reading

Successfully Defending a Claim Against Denial

Today’s blog is my favorite type – a success story!  One of our clients has graciously allowed me to relate his story to our readers as an example of how having expert help and standing up for your rights can lead to a positive outcome in your disability claim.

Continue reading

Total vs. Residual Disability: A Doctor’s Unpleasant Surprise

Residual Disability

Ask any doctor – having your own practice is a lot of work. Not only seeing patients, but all the paperwork, employee problems, and hundreds of other nagging issues involved in running a business.

If you become disabled, the process of filing a claim for benefits isn’t much easier. Disability insurance companies see doctors as a fantastic market to sell more insurance and generate new premiums while at the same coming up with defense tactics to deny their claims. A common tactic is to discretely change a claim from total disability to residual disability. Most insureds have little idea of the downsides of this change until it’s too late! It’s important to recognize how and why insurance companies use these claim denying strategies so insureds – especially medical professionals – can be prepared on how to respond to these insurance company tactics. Continue reading